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Automotive Solutions

JMatos and CMatos Software in Vehicles

The predominant vision for telematics is that the automobile will be a node
on a mobile network providing personalized and contextualized services
and information to the user. PsiNaptic believes the key is to enable devices
to discover and share services and information without human configuration
and management.

The automotive industry is heading toward enhancing the consumer
in-vehicle experience, offering to connect drivers and passengers to home
and work life comfortably and conveniently. The move toward wireless connectivity of the autmobile, its subsystems, passengers, services and infrastructure is well underway. According to the Telematics Research Group,
it will continue to develop rapidly for the next five to 10 years. One of the
many challenges is the need to offer telematic services beyond the vehicle
and integrate them into a broader mobile service offering. To do this, auto makers are looking for ingenious solutions to bridge the gap betwen the life
cycle of consumer devices and the life of the vehicle. Transparent interaction between devices from different manufacturers and the user's ability to easily, quickly and reliably access device services across network and physical boundaries will significantly impact the adoption of devices and services.

PsiNaptic's JMatos and CMatos software enable the car manufacturers to add devices and services to interact with the car's telematic systems throughout
the design, manufacture, sales and ownership phases. By adding JMatos or CMatos software to Java-enabled telematic systems and vehicle subsystems, automobile manufacturers and their suppliers can increase the number of electronic subsystems that can be added or modified near the time of
production or post-production. This will allow them greater flexibility to add improvements, new technology and new features to increase customer satisfaction and reduce the cost of modifications and retrofits.

JMatos and CMatos technology have been gaining traction with original equipment manufacturers' (OEMs) telematic platforms. PsiNaptic's most
recent success story is with the Ford Research Group, which incorporated JMatos into its vehicle consumer service interface (VCSI) middleware because
of the ability to facilitate the integration of mobile devices in the vehicle and extend telematic services beyond the vehicle. Through the interface, future
car buyers would enjoy virtually continuous access to information services tailored to their needs, preferences and locations -- from real time traffic and weather reports to personal calendar notes and restaurant reservation
services (see success story http://www.sun.com/service/about/success/recent/FordReserch.html).

Ford Research and PsiNaptic collaborated on a white paper entitled, "Integration of In-Vehicle Components Leveraging Jini Technology",
which describes a solution developed by Ford Research to manage the interaction of in-vehicle modules and devices in a standardized (across Ford Motor Company) manner.

For a detailed look at what PsiNaptic technology can do for the automotive telematic industry, read our white paper entitled, "The Evolution of Jini Technology in Telematics".

 


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© 2004 PsiNaptic Inc.

Jini™ and all Jini-based marks are trademarks or registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems Inc. in the US and other countries.

Java™ and all Java-based marks are trademarks or registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems Inc. in the US and other countries.

JMatos™ and JCopia™ and PsiNode™ and PsiNaptic™ are trademarks of PsiNaptic Inc.

The Bluetooth™ trademarks are owned by Bluetooth SIG, Inc.
© Bluetooth SIG, Inc. 2007.